Toto Wolff: Media ‘noise’ is for being ‘at the hairdressers' or 'lunch breaks'

Toto Wolff says the “noise” the media create is only for lunch breaks and hairdressers and he does not pay any attention to it. 

The Mercedes team boss has been in the headlines perhaps more than ever this season as his team and Lewis Hamilton battle Red Bull and Max Verstappen for both World Championships.

Said headlines have often been about the war of words between himself and Red Bull counterpart Christian Horner, with the two team principals clashing throughout the year.

Their drivers have done the same on track, leading to claims of a rivalry between the two that Verstappen has responded to by saying the relationship they have is just “fine”.

“It’s good,” he said in an interview with The Gentleman’s Journal.

“I mean, we’re how competitors should be. We’re not exactly going to have dinner together but that’s fine.

“You have that competitive spirit and we always try to beat each other on track, but also try to respect each other off track as well.

“So far there have been some tense moments, but overall it’s been all right.”

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Wolff has joined the Red Bull driver in addressing the “noise” that has been created by the media over the course of this season.

While he says they’re important to the sport, he feels their stories only really serve a purpose for people on their lunch breaks or at the hairdressers and doesn’t pay much attention to them himself.

“It is important that we have the fans and also the media,” he told Sky.

“Actually, it is a noise. You can read it during your lunch break or at the hairdressers.

“At the end of the day, you have to concentrate on what’s going on in the company.”

 

Verstappen feels similarly to Wolff in that regard.

“I know what I have to know in F1, within the team, and I’m not really interested in all the other stories around,” he said.

“I don’t want to follow it. I don’t want to see it on my feed. I just focus on having my own time with family and friends when I’m at home. If I am on social media, I don’t want to see a racing car.”

“It’s not going to influence anything I do on the weekend, on the track, or my performance, so it’s just a waste of time to look at it.”

 

 

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