How Did This Torched Singer End Up On Copart?

Car wholesaler Copart and the people who browse it have seen their share of fire-kissed beauties go up for sale. But rarely do they see several classic cars in such condition hit the site all at once, such as this collection of scorched Porsches—one of them a slightly singed 1993 Singer—that just landed at a Copart lot in Connecticut. And all to blame, as indicated by a Singer spokesperson indicated to Road & Track, was a huge house fire.

“An incident at a private residence resulted in a fire that spread to and destroyed a number of cars, including this Porsche 911 restored by Singer,” Singer told the outlet. “Our sympathies are with the owner, who is understandably devastated and wishes to remain anonymous.”





Be it identity protection or other factors, information on the fire that damaged the nine exotic or classic cars that just hit the reseller’s lot in the city of Hartford has proven hard to come by. After hitting dead ends on multiple leads, looking into the pasts of two seared Porsche 911Ts—1969 and 1973 respectively—led to information suggesting they were housed somewhere in Long Island, New York.

Both cars were sold via Bring A Trailer in Spring 2019 to someone bidding as kgtkgtkgt, who stated they would keep the 1969 “in FL and Shelter Island, NY.” That’s near the tip of Long Island, and just across Long Island Sound from Connecticut. Beyond that, we have found no reliable information on the collection’s location, leaving us only with the ugly aftermath of a fire to examine.

Running a similar VIN search on the fourth 911, a 1989 model, leads to a 2014 classified posting on Porsche forum Rennlist, where the seller identifies it as a 930 Turbo Targa. Porsche is said to have sold only 49 cars of this spec in the United States that year, and prices of other 930 Turbos on the market suggest this to be a six-figure car at the minimum. In its former life, it would have been kept company by similarly valuable cars, notably two Aston Martin Vantages of different eras and a BMW Z8. Slightly less valuable, though still the apples of someone’s eyes were a Ferrari 360 Modena and a Macan Turbo.





Altogether, it wasn’t a bad amalgamation of machinery, and its loss has understandably grieved its owner. But those tears will probably begin to dry up when the insurance company cuts its check—as that check will be, as Charles Dickens would put it, ponderous.

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h/t: Jason Saini

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