Tesla Inspecting Salvaged EVs To Allow Them To Use Superchargers

We’ve been following and sharing many makers, DIYers, and the like for years now. This is primarily because some of them started using wrecked Tesla vehicles to make fascinating creations. However, Tesla stopped allowing salvaged models access to its Supercharger network in 2020, which put a dent in some folks’ rebuilding plans.

It makes sense that Tesla would want to ensure the safety of not only the owner of the salvaged vehicle, but also anyone else using the Supercharger station, the other nearby vehicles, and the station itself. It’s hard to know what might go wrong if a wrecked EV is DC Fast Charging, but Tesla was arguably wise in not wanting to find out.

At any rate, some wrecked and/or salvaged vehicles are in much different condition than others. An EV could appear destroyed and still have its battery pack and all of its charging-related parts intact. Meanwhile, another Tesla model could look like new and have an excess of water damage or other internal damage to its electrical system that could end up causing a catastrophe.

In a perfect world, Tesla would take each case independently, and determine whether or not a salvaged model is in good enough shape to use its Supercharger network. Fortunately for those who rebuild or reuse these cars, it seems Tesla is moving forward with such a plan.

As you can see from the article above, Tesla did end up allowing some salvaged cars to charge on the Supercharger network after the 2020 ban, but it seemed as though it may have been a mistake. Not long after the cars were allowed to charge, Tesla put a stop to it.

Fast-forward to the present, and Electrek says it got its hands on some “internal Tesla documents” that outline a new process for getting salvaged models back on the fast-charging network. The document is called Salvaged-Titled Vehicle Fast Charging Safety Inspection, and it reveals a two-step inspection process that could lead to reinstating the EV’s Supercharging permissions.

If the car passes the tests, it will be able to Supercharge again. If it doesn’t pass, Tesla will offer to repair it so that it can pass. Electrek says the new process will apply to all Tesla models going forward.

Source: Electrek

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