Crowley Hints At 6 MWh Electric Tugboat With Autonomous Tech

It’s equipped with two 1.8 MWh electric motors.

Crowley Engineering Services announced the completion of the design of the U.S. first fully electric tugboat with autonomous technology.

It might be also one of the most powerful ones, as according to the specs it will be equipped with two 1.8 MW electric motors (total 3.6 MW), and a 6 MWh (6,000 kWh) battery pack. That’s a lot of power and energy.

“The 82-foot tug will provide 70 short tons of bollard pull, featuring an Azimuthing drive propulsion system with two 1,800 kW motors and a 6 MWh battery.”

The company adds that the tugboat is highly customizable, including modular and upgradable battery. The offer includes also an onshore charging station, which we guess will have to also in the MW-level.

“With no exhaust stack, the tug has 360 degrees of visibility from the pilot’s station, allowing the operator to see without obstruction. The electric tug has also been designed for future autonomous operation to increase the safety and efficiency of the operation including integrated automation and control systems. The intelligent maneuvering and control system offers more efficient vessel operations and allows masters to focus holistically on the overall control and positioning of the vessel in increasingly busy harbors.”

Ray Martus, vice president, Crowley Engineering Services said:

“Crowley’s design provides operators the tugboat solution to continue serving ships quickly and powerfully, while reducing their environmental impact by eliminating a carbon footprint. This new design sets the standard for innovation by showing that sustainability and power can work together seamlessly in our maritime industries.”

See technical details in the pdf here.

The first fully-electric tug with 70,000 tonnes of bollard pull was introduced in Auckland, New Zealand. The Damen RSD-E Tug 2513 was ordered in 2019 and completed in December 2020 by Damen Shipyards Group’s Song Cam Shipyard in Vietnam.

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